Our four MMJ students were picked out of an incredible group from the US and abroad. Our selections stood out for their well-rounded skill sets, innovative ideas, and recommendations by their professors. These four students worked to cover BEA2022 and the NAB show, which can be found below.

Meet The Team

Abigail Clark

Abigail Clark

Student MMJ

University of Georgia
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Cambrie Eckert

Cambrie Eckert

Student MMJ

Suny Brockport
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Canaan Sims

Canaan Sims

Student MMJ

Deleware State University
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Jacob Hall

Jacob Hall

Student MMJ

Kansas State University
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2022 Coverage

Videos

NAB Show Returns To Las Vegas For 2022 Conference; Announces 2023 Dates

By: Jacob Hall, Abigail Clark

LAS VEGAS, Nev. – The NAB Show is one of the largest broadcast conferences in the world, but for the last two years, all in-person programming was halted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This year, however, there were a total of 900 exhibitors and over 52,000 registered attendees eager to return to some semblance of normalcy.

Tony Huet, an attendee of the NAB show, said that the feeling was different when he stepped inside the Las Vegas Convention Center.

“When I first got here, I was reminded immediately of how much I enjoy being here,” Huet said. “It’s just not the same if you’re not here looking at everything and meeting people. Just walking around, I ran into some old friends and co-workers and it’s just been great to have that in person again. Plus, seeing the equipment and everything in person helps a lot. It’s just a one-stop-shop for everything there is to know about the business.”

Michelle Martorell, an Enterprise Sales Mgr. for the Northern U.S., Canada and Latin America at Xencelabs, said that being back in person will allow her company to share their new products with more people.

“We launched a new product during COVID so believe me to tell you that we are very happy to be back out in person,” Martorell said. “We did everything online and now having people to try our actual tablets is amazing. So, I am really happy that people can actually try my tablets.” 

Also represented at the NAB Show were over 11,000 international attendees and a total of 155 countries represented.

NAB announced that next year’s show will take place in Las Vegas from April 15 – 19 and will mark the 100th anniversary of the first convention.



NAB Session Moderator Aims To Create Diverse Pipelines For Entry-Level Jobs

By: Jacob Hall, Abigail Clark

LAS VEGAS, Nev. – At the NAB Show, one session honed in on diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives when talking about hiring students right out of college.

Grady Tripp, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer at TEGNA, said that it starts with looking at diversity in journalism schools.

“I would say that first and foremost, what is diversity like in our J-schools and then what storytelling is within J-schools with either a local newspaper or whatever the campus television station,” Tripp said. “Because what we heard from the panel and others is that it’s not just a representation of your newsroom company, but people are also interested in the storytelling that is taking place.”

Tripp said that an important aspect for companies trying to be more diverse and inclusive is to connect with employees from all backgrounds to learn about their experiences. 

“Make sure that you are connecting with employees from all backgrounds to understand what their experience is within your organization and address whatever issues or needs they have,” Tripp said. “Because when you have a job opening, if all of your employees aren’t running to their network saying, ‘hey, you got to work here,’ you’ve got to ask yourself some really important questions, right? I think that’s one. I think number two, partnering with colleges and universities as well as other diverse organizations to be able to tap into those networks. So, what partnerships are you creating with the J-school? Are you at campus? Are you reaching out to students to build that future talent?”

Taylor Potter, a current Masters of Fine Arts student at the University of Georgia, said that it’s nice to see sessions taking place regarding representation in the entertainment media space. 

“The one that I just came from was about pronunciation and learning how the ‘other’ is represented in entertainment media,” Potter said. “So, we talked a lot about people who are typically classified as ‘other’ in media so whether that be your sexual orientation, your race or other levels of diversity that we are constantly pushing for more inclusion of in entertainment media. How we as members of those communities can push to have a more inclusive entertainment media space where more of the world is represented.” 



Blackmagic Design Aims To Use Their Editing Software To Reach More Student Creatives

By: Jacob Hall, Abigail Clark

LAS VEGAS, Nev. – During the five-day NAB Show, the company Blackmagic Design introduced many of its latest camera products and production switchers. But perhaps the biggest hit of all was sessions regarding the company’s free editing software, DaVinci Resolve.

David Hoffman, Blackmagic Design’s Business Development Mgr. for the Americas, said that a major emphasis for the company is to market their software out to more colleges and universities to give student creatives the chance to have a cheaper, high-quality alternative.

“We really look back to the emerging creators and look at how our tools are available to them,” Hoffman said. “It’s been a big part of the Blackmagic soul and ethos. Being able to give young creators access to the technology, while maintaining the high quality and the integrity of the production value of our tools. So, the whole suite has continued to grow. We just released version 18 of the product and it’s free.”

Sherwin Lau, an associate professor at New Mexico State University, said that he has completely transitioned to teaching DaVinci Resolve in his classes and it has allowed students to continue working on projects post-graduation.

“It’s free so they can download it right now on their laptops or their home computers and when they graduate, they don’t have to change anything,” Lau said. “Because I know that when you graduate, you lose the student discount. So, maybe student discounts are good and they can afford it right now. But as they’re gone, they don’t have their emails anymore, so they can’t do that. So, being able to have a continuous flow from as a student all the way through post-graduation. It’s been a game-changer for a lot of students.”



HBCU Journalism Program Trying To Set The Standard For Future Journalists In The industry

By: Jacob Hall, Abigail Clark

LAS VEGAS, Nev. – At the BEA Conference, a trio of faculty members from Morgan State University participated in a panel about creating a new age sports journalism program that is intertwined with research, while also bringing race to the forefront of the discussion. 

Edward G. Robinson III, the Prof. of Practice Dir. at the Center for the Study of Race and Culture in Sports at Morgan State University, said that the curriculum aims to teach students about standing out in the changing media landscape. 

“We have to be aware of the changing forms of journalism,” Robinson said. “We understand that we can’t continue the same models where traditional models of print journalism is the only model. We have to build students’ foundations the same way, but look at other burgeoning parts of the industry – multimedia platform journalists. We want multimedia experts.” 

Robinson said that when it comes to research, they want to set the standard for how race and sports are viewed together.

“We are coming from a place where we give a perspective from the African American community, so when we look at issues, we don’t want to do what everyone else is doing,” Robinson said. “We want to give you a perspective from our community where we’re doing research, where we’re invested. Our students and their parents come to us and they are looking for that experience. They know where they’re going and it’s a part of our DNA.”

Tyus Sansbury, a current senior at Virginia State University, attended the session and said that he was inspired by the fact that Morgan State has a student-run TV show and he would like to start one of his own. 

“I want to be a sports analyst or play-by-play announcer and I think it would be a good thing for us to develop one of those things because I know other people at my school that want to be the same thing that I want to be,” Sansbury said. “I’m not saying we don’t have the necessary opportunities, but creating more opportunities for people coming behind me is a great thing to do.”



Canon U.S.A. Showcases Products In A Smaller Exhibit Booth

By: Jacob Hall, Abigail Clark

LAS VEGAS, Nev. – At the NAB Show this year, the Canon U.S.A. booth was smaller than in previous years, but what it lacked in size, it was able to make up in product showcasing. 

Len Musmeci, Sr. Mgr. of Professional Production Systems at Canon U.S.A., said that with the show being back in person, they were able to cater to all of their key markets. 

“We have a whole host of solutions to roll out here,” Musmeci said. “Broadcast, education, house of worship and cinema – we’re targeting all of our key markets here. At the NAB Show itself, it’s become like the premiere market for anything motion video and motion capture.” 

Musmeci said that although creative tactics were used to reach out to customers while everything was virtual, overall sales remained steady.

“The need for imaging equipment actually spiked a little because suddenly news agencies and broadcasters were filming from home so everyone needed a camera and a unit,” Musmeci said. “You know, every corporation was doing virtual meetings and virtual town halls. The houses of worship were streaming their services now to all their congregations to make sure that they stayed in touch with their communities and kept them tied together. So, we really saw a lot of creativity and an increased use of all imaging equipment across all the markets and all the ranges.”



Interview With Network Infrastructure Company Arista

By: Jacob Hall, Abigail Clark

LAS VEGAS, Nev. – Arista is a network infrastructure company out of California that has innovated in broadcast networking, applying principles learned from supporting the latest cloud and financial networks to broadcast media.

We went to their booth in Central Hall at the Las Vegas Convention Center to hear how it feels to be back in person again this year.






NAB Show Attendees Get From Point A to Point B In An Electric Way

By: Jacob Hall, Abigail Clark

LAS VEGAS, Nev. – During the 2022 NAB Show, tens of thousands of attendees were able to navigate the 4.6 million square foot Las Vegas Convention Center with the help of Tesla’s which chartered people through underground tunnels from one end of the center to the other. 

Underneath the Las Vegas Convention Center is a forty-foot deep, one-mile route that took a year and a half to build and can run 70 vehicles at one time. During the convention, this made getting from West Hall to North Hall much easier. 

The end game for the Boring Company is to create an underground network of 51 stops throughout the city that spans 28 miles and will connect to the stadium, the airport and everything else in between. 

More information can be found at the link below:

https://www.boringcompany.com/vegas-loop



Articles

Portable Recording Studio

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Interview With Network Infrastructure Company Arista

https://youtu.be/cvD7r0XxyKI By: Jacob Hall, Abigail Clark LAS VEGAS, Nev. – Arista is a network infrastructure company out of California that has innovated in broadcast networking, applying principles learned from supporting the latest cloud and financial networks to...

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