Note regarding session locations: Sessions take place in the Village Center of the Williams Village area of the campus (see the corresponding rooms listed below).  Please note that the following tour and workshops all take place on the main campus…. Thursday afternoon campus tour, the Ross Video Workshop, the What’s New in AR Workshop, and the Intro to VR Workshop.  Please see the Campus Maps for locations.

Thursday, October 10

[Thursday]
3:00 – 5:00 pm
Breakout A

 

 


Data Journalism Workshop
[Workshop]
Virtually any story is improved by seeking the data behind it. In this workshop, we’ll examine some commonly available datasets that newsrooms/students should be familiar with. We’ll discuss potential pitfalls and ethics of using data. And we’ll use Excel to do some hands-on analysis of a dataset and to learn how to teach basic data analysis in reporting classes.
NOTE: Workshop participants should bring a laptop with Excel to the session for the hands-on portion. Max attendance: 30
Presenter: Sandra Fish, University of Colorado-Boulder 

[Thursday]
3:00 – 5:00 pm
University Memorial Center Fountain (on campus)
View map


Campus Facilities Tour
[General Track]
The University of Colorado Boulder is considered one of the most beautiful campuses in the country, with its signature sandstone buildings nestled against the Flatairons of the Rocky Mountains. This tour takes you around the campus to see the College of Media, Communication, and Information’s buildings and production facilities, including the ATLAS complex (which hosts the television studio), the immersive technology lab (located in Folsom Field), and the historic Armory. 

[Thursday]
5:30 – 7:30 pm
Room A, B & C


BEA On-Location Welcome Reception
As per the laws of the State of Colorado and the policies of the University of Colorado Boulder, all registrants should hereby be aware that some portion of the registration fee will be used to purchase alcoholic beverages.
Special thanks to our sponsors Ross Video and FirstCom Music!

Friday, October 11

[Friday]
8:30 – 10:30 am
Armory Building – Room 201
View map


Ross Video Workshop: Teaching Industry-standard video production workflows for workforce ready applications
[Workshop]
Your students get hired to be tomorrow’s content producers when your long-term curriculum choices expose your students to fundamental instruction and production opportunities centered around market driven industry-standard workflows for workforce ready applications. Get hands on in this interactive session and learn exactly how peer BEA Members and peer BEA Member Institutions are successfully accomplishing this in a well way for the benefit of their students, for the benefit of their school, for the benefit of their student’s future employers. BEA faculty, staff, administrators, students and industry partners invited to attend. Max attendance: 20
Presenters: Matt Peschau, Business Development Manager – Education, Ross Video
Marcel Fontaine, Regional Sales Manager, Ross Video

[Friday]
8:30 – 10:30 am
Folsom Field Stadium – Room 136 (between gates 5 & 6)
View map

 

AR Workshop: What’s New in AR?
[Workshop]
Learn the latest techniques for building AR projects using tools found in Apple’s App Store in CU Boulder’s Immersive Lab. Max attendance: 16
Moderated by Jason Gnerre, University of Colorado Boulder 

[Friday]
8:30 – 10:30 am
Breakout A


Drone Workshop: Five Challenges (and Solutions!) to Teaching a Drones Class
[Workshop]
Many schools and universities have either considered or started teaching a drones class in the past few years, but it’s not as simple as it may appear. Even among some professors already leading a drones program, there is still much confusion over what can and can’t be done with drones in the classroom. This panel will cover five of the biggest challenges to teaching a drones class – and feature solutions to make the class be as successful as possible.
Presenter: Dale Blasingame, Texas State University

[Friday]
8:30 – 10:30 am
Village View


Creative Works Competition Screening – Faculty Documentary
[Creative Showcase] 
Documentary Competition (Short Form Category)
Adam J. Kuban, Sofia Sarkar, Linnea Langkammer & Mythili Soundararajan, Ball State University; The Talk
Documentary Competition (Long Form Category)
Patricia Williamson & Eric Limarenko, Central Michigan University; Breaking the Sound Barrier
James Curry, Augsburg University in Minneapolis; masterjam
 

[Friday]
10:30 – 11:00 am
Registration Area


Interactive Poster Session
[General Track]
Take a look at the posters while enjoying a coffee and snack break!
Minso Kim, University of Colorado Boulder; Being Close to Nature While in Indoor Spaces

Lowery Woodall, Millersville University of PA; Wrestling With God: Representations of Religion and Spirituality in the WWE

[Friday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Room A


Fair and Balanced? The Intersection of Politics and Journalism
[Political Communication Track]
Danielle Deavours, University of Alabama; Professional Norm of Neutrality in Award-Winning Broadcast Journalism
Darrell Roe, Eastern New Mexico University; Clap-Trap Tweets and Epideictic Episodes: Two Years of Evaluative Praise from President Trump

[Friday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Room B


Breaking the Rules of Broadcast with Immersive Video

[Immersive Track]
This panel will cover the new opportunities and some of the challenges with teaching virtual reality, 360° video and augmented reality in the college classroom. Because immersive content is consumed in an entirely different way than traditional broadcast video storytelling, the way we teach these topics and skills must evolve as well. Everything from framing a shot, to text on the screen, to storyboarding, to going live must be re-thought with the end user and platform in mind.
While maintaining the best of traditional video storytelling, students and journalists alike must adopt new opportunities afforded by this new medium and be willing to re-learn some age-old practices. This panel will be a robust discussion on best practices, key differences, and the importance of “breaking the rules” of traditional video storytelling in order to reach audiences effectively.
Moderator: Jon Zmikly, Texas State University
Panelists: Robert Hernandez, USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
Jesse Ryan, alumna, USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism

Felicia Quichocho, Texas State University

[Friday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Room C


Communicating Your Value as A Creative Scholar

[Faculty Development Track]
This panel will explore issues and challenges in recognizing creative-based scholarship as equally valid to academic research. Panelists will facilitate discussion concerning best practices for creative scholars approaching the reappointment, tenure and promotion process. 
Moderator: Michael Bruce, University of Alabama
Panelists: Kathleen Ryan, University of Colorado Boulder

Scott Hodgson, University of Oklahoma
Vic Costello, Elon University

[Friday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Breakout A


The Curated Professor: Effective methods for using third party films and videos in the production classroom
[Pedagogy Track]
Online tutorials, youtube channels, MOOCs, and many other content creators provide a wide breadth of learning material available to budding filmmakers. Streaming video platforms provide access for students to watch professional work. Many Universities now provide free or substantially discounted subscriptions to Lynda.com, Masterclass, and CreativeLive, and students often seek out video tutorials to fill in knowledge gaps. The New York times declared 2012 as the ‘year of the MOOC’ and other online courses and columnists there claimed they would bring a revolution. However, over the years, they have evolved from a buzzword to a punchline, particularly among professors who were skeptical of their value. This panel explores the professor as curator. Panelists will discuss resources available, how they use these resources in their classroom (if at all), and how they contextualize these learning resources for students. What value, if any, does this material provide for our students and for us as production professors? More importantly, how might we use material from other sources most effectively in our curriculum?
Moderator: Jes Therkelsen, California State University, Fresno
Panelists: Jes Therkelsen, California State University, Fresno
Adam Kuban, Ball State University
James Machado, Millersville University

[Friday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Breakout B


Emotional Investments, Connected Meanings, and Audience Engagement
[Media Representations Track]
This panel addresses the question of connected meanings and interaction gained through participation in and with a communication act, practice, or text. We are interested in discussing texts and reception, as well as producers and receiver/participants. Many scholars over many years have investigated the differences between active and passive reception; how viewing practices can and often do become social interactions; and how individuals and communities may consume texts differently, based on experiences, needs, values, and “reading” habits. As Simons (2014) has noted, however, few studies have examined how audiences actually engage with content to produce an emotional investment in the communication event. How does a text (defined broadly) become what Simons terms an “active medium, capable of capturing and holding the audience’s attention?” How can the design, production elements, dissemination apparatus, purpose, history, or structure work to connect people in a deep and meaningful way to the experiences of the text? In essence, how can communication become immersive, transportive, transformational, and emotionally and intellectually compelling?  The papers comprising this panel examine audience engagement from four different perspectives: oral history and community connection; the power of music to convey and engender meaning; distribution of horror through traditional and new media; and immersive theatre production strategies on public television.
Moderator: Glenda R. Balas, University of North Texas at Dallas
Panelists: Carla Carter, University of North Texas; Digital Stories and Oral History: Interactive Community Video in North Texas
Jason Lee Guthrie, Samford University; The Music Never Stopped’: The Ritual Economy of Jam Band Fandom
Glenda Balas, University of North Texas at Dallas; Producing Cracks in the ‘Fourth Wall’: Sound of Music’s Immersive Strategies of Audience Engagement
Judith White, University of New Mexico, Can Entertainment Education Boost Cultural Engagement, Self-Esteem, and Regard for Origins among Black Youth: Relevant Themes in Black Panther

 

[Friday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Village View


Creative Works Competition Screening – Faculty & Student Narrative Film
[Creative Showcase]
Faculty Narrative Film Competition
Jason Balas, University of North Texas; A Dark Matter
Aaron Schuelke, California State University, Fresno; Inheritance
Student Narrative Film Competition

Trey Lehman, Zheng Qu & Ian Valencia, University of Oklahoma; The Set: Tripsetters
Lennon Bramlett & Rebecca Lynne Wagner, University of Oklahoma; M. (an adaptation from Macbeth)
Trae Brown, Pittsburg State University; The Day I Tried to Live

[Friday]
12:00 – 1:30 pm
Dining Hall


Lunch in the Williams Village Dining Hall

[Friday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Room B


Getting Polliterate / Gaining Expertise in Reporting on Public Opinion Polls
[Political Communication]
Presenter: Jay De Dapper, Director of Innovation, Marist Institute for Public Opinion

[Friday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Breakout A


360 Video Storytelling; Student Productions Gone Right!
[Immersive Track]
In 2015 the New York Times started producing VR stories and in 2016 created a series called The Daily 360. This series distributes 360-degree video every day from all over the world. As technology costs decrease, universities can acquire the technology to train and prepare students for jobs in the 360-video storytelling industry. This panel will offer insights to the challenges and successes of student productions using 360-video for distribution to target audiences. The composition of this panel supports BEA’s mission of diversity and inclusion. Women are still the minority in film and television. This panel is composed of four women who are trained in 360 video production and have worked with a variety of students to produce content for distribution. We are submitting to the special-call for AR/VR/Immersive technology. Storytelling using 360-video is immersive and becoming easier to use. This panel will provide a forum for educators to identify issues, successes, ideas, and to collaborate on ways to incorporate this technology in the classroom, which could in turn, prepare students for the industry.
Moderator: Angela Criscoe, Georgia College & State University
Panelists: Chandra Clark, University of Alabama
Angela Criscoe, Georgia College & State University
Stephanie Dean, Middle Tennessee State University
Leigh Wright, Murray State University

[Friday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Room A


Academic Labor and Faculty Mental Health
[Faculty Development]
In March of 2018 the journal Nature (2018) reported on the results of an international survey that found that Master’s and Ph.D. students report “rates of depression and anxiety that are six times higher than those in the general public” (p. 691). These results, published in the journal Nature Biotechnology are part of a broader trend of the increasing pressures that academic labor creates (Evans, et al., 2018). A 2017 study of Ph.D. students in Blegium found that 32% of them were “at risk of having or developing a common psychiatric disorder, especially depression” (Levecque, et al., p. 868). For international students there are extra challenges, such as language barriers, that make dealing with mental health even more challenging (Turnage, 2017).   These problems facing students are also prevalent for faculty and, as Price et al. (2017) point out, less attention is paid to mental health problems that faculty face. In a report for the Higher Education Policy Institute Liz Morrish (2019) refers to universities as “anxiety machines” (p. 9). She found a troubling increase in mental health problems for faculty in UK universities. Price et al. conducted a survey that found that very few faculty members receive institutional support for mental health issues, with many not even knowing how to seek it out. Adding to this problem is the fact that, not only is faculty mental health often overlooked, but faculty are also called on to help manage the mental health problems of students (Kafka, 2018). The March 2019 suicide of prominent economist Alan Kreuger is the worst possible tragedy that calls on us to confront “an academic culture that makes disclosing mental illness difficult” (Petit, 2019, para. 1).   The approach of this panel will be to function as more of a roundtable discussion. We plan on beginning with brief contributions from each panelist that will serve as critiques of the nature of academic labor and mental health. We will then open the floor for questions and conversation between panelists and with the audience to cultivate a conversation about faculty resources, strategies and tactics to better manage mental health issues both for ourselves and for our students.
Moderator: Adam Kuban Ball State University
Panelists: Terry Filipowicz, Pima Community College
Stacey Irwin, Millersville University
Robert Spicer, Millersville University 

[Friday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Breakout B


Visual Media Abroad: Pragmatic Advice for International Production Experiences
[Pedagogy Track]
There is increasing interest in study abroad, applied learning, and ‘experience beyond the classroom’ learning opportunities at American universities. Panelists consist of experienced professors who have taken students on many international, media-centric trips. Get a better handle on the challenges, rewards, and nuances of taking media students abroad for credit. This panel includes: client-driven production projects, independent student media artifacts, securing funding, recruiting students, international production hurdles, and assessment of the student experience.
Moderator: William J. Bolduc, University of North Carolina @ Wilmington
Panelists: William J. Bolduc, University of North Carolina @ Wilmington; Partnering with your university’s study abroad program – recruiting students
Greg Luft, Colorado State University; Semester at Sea: Photography & video
Steve Anderson, James Madison University; Building a Departmental Production Experience Abroad

[Friday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Room C


Broadcast News Practices in the 21st Century
[State of the Industry Track]
Norman Youngblood, Auburn University & Lakshmi Tirumala, Drake University; Local Television News Station Compliance with Online Captioning Rules
Madeleine Liseblad, Middle Tennessee State University; Storytelling, Standups and Live Shots: Strengthening the British Television News Reporter Role
George L. Daniels, The University of Alabama; Conducting A “Black Men on TV” News Analysis: The Story of Two Markets
 

[Friday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Village View


Creative Works Competition Screening – Faculty & Student Audio
[Creative Showcase]
Faculty Audio Competition
Nathan Gibbs, Abilene Christian University; Abilene Police Chief Apologizes to Family of 1922 Lynching Victim
Joe Sampson & Rosemary Pennington, Miami University; Being Muslim in the Midwest
Student Audio Competition
Madilyn Cook & Riley Lehman, University of Oklahoma; Beauty Pageant
Dylon Klubertanz, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh; Rich the Barber
Mariam Salah, The American University in Cairo; Bird, Karaoke and American Football
Reem Hassan, The American University in Cairo; The Story Behind Room P071
Dania Akkawi, The American University in Cairo; Before It’s Gone

[Friday]
2:45 – 3:45 pm
Room A


Communication Technology Update 2019
[Immersive Track]
This panel will explore the most recent advances in electronic mass media, computers, consumer electronics, networking, and telephony. All of the presenters are authors of chapters in the upcoming Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals (17th edition), scheduled for publication in June 2020. In addressing recent developments and patterns of use, the panelists will address equipment, software, organizational structure, regulation, and users. Following a discussion of developments in individual technologies, the panelists will interact with session attendees to attempt to draw larger conclusions about the trajectory of communication technologies, including impacts and barriers to adoption and use.
Moderator: Augie Grant, University of South Carolina
Panelists: Jennifer Meadows, California State University, Chico
Jeffery Wilkinson, Florida A&M University
Isaac Pletcher, Louisiana State University
Tony DeMars, Texas A&M University, Commerce 

[Friday]
2:45 – 3:45 pm
Breakout A


Effective Collaborations: Faculty reflect on their own collaborative experiences
[Faculty Development Track]
Filmmaking is often a collaborative experience in the classroom as students work to emulate real life situations working in teams. But what about faculty and their collaborations? Whether collaborating with subjects or co-creators in documentary filmmaking, cast and crew in narrative productions or with artists from other fields who want to visualize their work, faculty creative collaborations can be critical to personal growth and promotion. In this panel a group of Colorado creatives working in academic institutions reflect on best practices, potential pitfalls and outcomes of their most recent collaborative efforts. We will explore questions around the special challenges of international collaborations and cross cultural filmmaking. We will examine how creative collaborations are similar to and different than research-based collaborations. We provide advice about how to frame collaborative creative work for tenure and promotion.
Moderator: Sheila E. Schroeder, University of Denver
Panelists: Jessica McGaugh, University of Colorado, Denver
Roma Sur, University of Colorado, Denver
Jack Lucido, Western Colorado University
Sheila E. Schroeder, University of Denver

[Friday]
2:45 – 3:45 pm
Breakout B


Toward a Critical, Creative, and Inclusive Pedagogy of Practice, Pt II
[Pedagogy Track]
Discussion of the pros and cons of disciplinary silos has been an ongoing, often heated, debate since the institution of the academy. Similarly, there’s a long-standing bifurcation that separates pedagogical approaches within those silos: praxis and theory are too often viewed as separate and not equal. This panel, the continuation of a dialogue started at BEA 2019, seeks to remedy that with an eye toward an outcome that weds the two in complementary fashion so as to inform a student approach that is both creatively engaged and theoretically grounded. Indeed these applications move from a siloed approach to a systematic one, creating an integrated, critical awareness of media production. Members of this panel call for the development of a holistic pedagogy to support such a system using techniques new, old, and revisited via a discussion of general classroom approaches and specific thought exercises designed to foster this environment. The panelists trace a trajectory from creative inception (can creativity be taught?), developing student buy in, planning and execution of the media object steeped in the union of theory/praxis, and, importantly, effective communication and the dissemination of that knowledge product. Strategies and systems to effect this pedagogical approach will be detailed by four panelists.
Moderator: Kathleen Ryan, University of Colorado-Boulder
Panelists: David Staton, University of Northern Colorado
David Gracon, Gonzaga University
Leighton C. Peterson, Miami University
Patrick Johnson, Indiana University Northwest

[Friday]
2:45 – 3:45 pm
Room C


Representation and Media: Three perspectives
[Media Representation Track]
Contemporary American politics features a lot of discussion (and hang wringing) over so-called identity politics and representation. Despite the abundance of conversation there has been an inadequate defining of the term PC and related ideas and events. This panel explores some specific ideas related to media, political discourse, identity, and representation in America. The first presentation will look at the evolution of LGBTQA characters television programs. It will start with All in the family and The Jeffersons and their stereotypical portrayals and move into more recent portrayals from shows such as the Real World, Ellen, and Will and Grace. The second presentation will examine three new content analyses that show symbolic annihilation at work in political and crime news, as well as tips to combat symbolic annihilation in newsrooms. Finally, the third presentation argues that the concept of political correctness is a basically meaningless political term that is little more than a rhetorical weapon. The accusation of “political correctness” is meant to force the speaker to first have to go through the process of justifying the existence of their speech before they can even begin to explain their ideas. In order to advance discussions about representation in media, discussions that will inevitably be labeled as “political correctness,” we must first make clear, in the broadest possible way, that accusations of political correctness are socially, politically, and intellectually inadequate.
Moderator: James Lohrey, Shippensburg University
Panelists: James Schiffman, Georgia College & State University; China in U.S. Media
Danielle Deavours, University of Alabama; Symbolic Annihilation In Sourcing Decisions
Robert Spicer, Millersville University; There’s no such thing as political correctness, and it’s a good thing too
James Lohrey, Shippensburg University; What Has the Past Fifty Years Taught Us About the LGBTQA Community in the Media?”

[Friday]
2:45 – 3:45 pm
Room B


Featured Panel: The State of Local News – Today & Tomorrow
[State of the Industry Track]
An increasing number of newspapers are folding while some combine and others search for new business models.  Local TV and local TV news thrive … even as the industry faces increasing challenges as audiences look more and more to digital channels for their information.  This panel will explore the current disrupted state of the industry and some of the many efforts to invigorate and reinvent local news.
Moderator: Bob Papper, Hofstra University
Patti Dennis, Vice President of News, Tegna
Kat Duncan, Sr. Editor, Innovation & Futures Lab, Reynolds Journalism Institute, Missouri School of Journalism
Melissa Milios Davis, Vice President – Strategic Communications and Informed Communities, Gates Family Foundation

[Friday]
2:45 – 3:45 pm
Village View


Creative Works Competition Screening – Student Documentary
[Creative Showcase]
Sterling Ellison, Michelle Bloxham, Clayton Keck & Samantha Locke, Midwestern State University; Guardians
Sean David Christensen, University of Southern California; Ghost Tape #10
Jacob Jolly, Zachary Bush, Easton Oliver & Olivianna Calmes, Oklahoma Baptist University; Back in The Saddle
Maddie Peterson, Riggan Cope, Mallory Austin & Timber Tate, University of North Carolina Wilmington; Chronic
 

[Friday]
4:00 – 4:30 pm
Breakout A & B


5 Things Content Creators Must Know About Production Music

Your creative ideas are over the top! Now you need music to bring your vision to life.  Join the experts from FirstCom Music to discover how to successfully navigate the social media take down, tips for editing short promos for social, how to avoid copyright infringement and more must know facts about using production music to create amazing. 
Presenter: Cristy Hyatt Coffey, Sr. Director, Marketing, FirstCom Music

[Friday]
4:30 – 5:00 pm
Breakout A & B


BEA On-Location Creative Competition Awards Ceremony

Join us as we celebrate this year’s faculty and student creative award winners.

[Friday]
5:15 – 8:00 pm
Rooms A, B & C


On-Location Dinner
As per the laws of the State of Colorado and the policies of the University of Colorado Boulder, all registrants should hereby be aware that some portion of the registration fee will be used to purchase alcoholic beverages.

Please join colleagues for dinner in Williams Village.

Saturday, October 12

[Saturday]
8:30 – 10:30 am
Breakout A


Interactive Storytelling 101

[Workshop]
Racontr is the web-based platform behind interactive documentaries such as Prison Valley and Fort McMoney. Lean the basics about using the platform for your projects. Computer recommended.

[Saturday]
8:30 – 10:30 am
Folsom Field Stadium – Room 136 (Between Gates 5 & 6)
View map


VR Workshop: Introduction to VR
[Workshop]
Practice VR basics using Unreal engine in CU Boulder’s Immersive Lab. Max attendance: 16
Moderated by Pat Clark, University of Colorado Boulder

[Saturday]
8:30 – 10:30 am
Room B


Social Media Conversations and Confirmation Bias: Exploring the Subjectivity of the Real Among Fake News Propaganda 

[Political Communication Mini-Symposium]
This two-part “Mini-Symposium” kick off panel brings out the challenges and responsibilities of social media companies to provide access to online conversations from a diversity of cultural and political viewpoints. Journalism educators, multimedia practitioners, and their audiences in the post-millennial age are explored in light of recent elections, political attacks, misrepresentations, source validation, and the ability to recognize “Fake News.”

PART I
Moderator: Melissa Jackson, Piedmont College
Panelists: Josh C. Bramlett, University of Missouri; Hostile Social Media: YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and Perceptions of Bias from the Left and the Right
Patricia Dobson, Eastern New Mexico University; Managing the Multimedia Story in a Fake News World: Teaching Journalism Students to Navigate the Boundaries Between the Ethical and the Real
Darrell Roe, Eastern New Mexico University; Political Tweets in a Post-Millennial Context: The New Frontier for Hate Speech

PART II
Moderator: Darrell Roe, Eastern New Mexico University
Panelists: Ed Caffrey, Regent University; Verifying the Validity of Veteran Stories: Helping Journalists Distinguish Between Real and Stolen Valor
David Rogers, Eastern New Mexico University; Meme Mentality: How Social Media Memes Distort and Fact and Destroy Communication
Zulfia Zaher, Central Michigan University; Is Artificial Intelligence Efficient in Detecting Fake News?

[Saturday]
8:30 – 10:30 am
Village View


Creative Works Competition Screening – Faculty & Student News
[Creative Showcase]
Faculty News Competition
Darren Sweeney, Central Connecticut State University/NBC-CT; Climate Change: Rising Sea Levels in Connecticut
Student News Competition (Story Category)

Ara Washburn, Midwestern State University; Earth Day
Brady Frederick, Washington State University; Hilinski’s Hope 3 for 3 Challenge
Student News Competition (Program Competition)
Abby Foster & Cheyenne Plummer, University of Oklahoma; OU Nightly
Harlee Toothman & Curt Watson, University of Oklahoma; How Do We Drive Away Hate Speech? (& Bring Back Civility to Public Discourse) 

[Saturday]
10:30 – 11:00 am
Room B


Mini-Symposium Poster Session
[Political Communication Mini-Symposium]
Enjoy coffee and snacks while you check out the Mini-Symposium posters.
Megan Condis, Texas Tech University; Playing at Racism: White Supremacist Recruitment in Video Game Culture

Robert Spicer, Millersville University of PA; Counter-Conspiracisms: Theorizing Conspiracy Theories in Media and Politics 

[Saturday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Room B


Mini-Symposium Research Session
[Political Communication Mini-Symposium]
Ron Rohlf, Fort Hays State University; Sympathy for The Donald: The Itchy Twitter Finger of POTUS #45 (A Fantasy Theme Analysis)
Ginger Blackstone, Harding University; The ‘Missing Middle’ in an Age of Perceived Political Polarization: How Independent are Self-Identified Independents and/or Moderates and What Are Their News Consumption Habits?
Miles Davis, University of Colorado-Boulder; Self-censorship: Foreign journalists’ reportage of Turkey 

[Saturday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Breakout A


METX: Media, Entertainment & Technology: Interdisciplinary storytelling using emerging technologies
[Immersive Track]
At Chico State three departments across 2 colleges (the Departments of Computer Animation and Game Development, Journalism and Public Relations, and Media Arts, Design, and Technology) are working together in a “virtual school” called Media, Entertainment & Technology or METX. The first METX course , Virtual and Augmented Reality for Media and Gaming was offered in Fall 17. Students learned about and used VR and AR and worked in interdisciplinary teams to produce a virtual campus tour using 360 video and Unity. In the Spring, an advanced class worked with a local client (Sierra Nevada Brewery) to produce 5 different projects (2 2D 4K video tours, a 360 video tour, and a VR experience of the original brewery from the early 80s) on their bottling process and the brewery. The following year the advanced class worked with Lundberg Farms, a major rice grower and rice product manufacturer. This panel will discuss: 1. The ins and outs of creating a cross college collaborative school and courses 2. The pros and cons of working with interdisciplinary teams in the classroom 3. Creating introductory and advanced courses in VR and AR 4. Working with every changing and often buggy new technologies. 5. Working with clients and students to create professional AR/VR work
Moderator: Jennifer Meadows, California State University – Chico
Panelists: Debra Johnson, California State University – Chico
Jeff Underwood, California State University – Chico
Quinn Winchell, California State University – Chico
Jennifer Meadows, California State University – Chico

[Saturday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Breakout B


Redefining Doctoral Education: Preparing Future Faculty to Lead Emerging Media Curriculum
[Faculty Development Track]
New tools that accommodate coding, data, social media, multimedia, virtual reality and other emerging platforms influence our concept of what it means to be a storyteller and have inspired varied levels of curriculum change in academic programs. The digital ecosystem introduces more than new skills to a program. It offers a new mindset about the role of a media organization that now manages a range of digital products and operates on a variety of platforms, engaging audiences and using data in storytelling and decision-making. Media organizations must recognize their role among the broader technology industry, where the activities of Facebook, Twitter, Apple, Amazon, Craigslist, Buzzfeed, Vox and more have an influence on media. Doctoral education, however, has remained fairly constant over the past twenty years. Most programs provide education in research methods and mass communication theory, allowing students to customize a program around their scholarly interests, working with mentors in their field. Few programs offer more than a single course on teaching or the pedagogy of the discipline. Combine this with the lack of a comprehensive appreciation for the role of technology in media, and the demand for scholar-educators who are prepared to address curriculum innovation greatly exceeds the supply of qualified applicants. The tenure-track provides a process by which early career faculty prove their ability to publish meaningful scholarship in their field. It also provides the pipeline by which faculty progress to positions of authority and judgment in the administration of a program. Personnel, curriculum and search committees are often led by, or decisions approved by, tenured faculty. In the mass communication discipline, while many programs rely on the contributions of professionals in the form of adjuncts and lecturers who provide valuable insight to professionalism, more strategic and comprehensive changes to curriculum are guided and approved by those with tenure. It is critical that these decision-makers have a strong appreciation of the modern media ecosystem, thus linking doctoral education to the need across academic curriculum at the Master’s and undergraduate levels. This panel will discuss opportunities and challenges associated with doctoral education in mass communication. It will address the following questions: 1. What is the range of digital competencies desired by academic programs on faculty position descriptions and how can these competencies be addressed in doctoral education? 2. How can digital concepts be integrated into research programs and scholarly pursuits? 3.What have been some approaches to curriculum change across the mass communication discipline and what has been the role of doctoral faculty in these endeavors? 4. What are the administrative opportunities and challenges associated with hiring Ph.Ds and driving curriculum change?
Moderator: Cindy Royal, Texas State University
Panelists: Cindy Royal, Texas State University
Lori Bergen, University of Colorado – Boulder
Jason Lee Guthrie,Samford University

[Saturday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Room A


Teaching Out of Touch Journalism Student and Fostering the Basics of News Literacy
[Pedagogy Track]
Teaching out of touch journalism student and fostering the basics of news literacy. Undergraduates studying news and sports writing, reporting, and producing come to courses out of touch with current events and disengaged with local news sources. Panelists will share and explore approaches to foster elements of basics of news literacy and news consumption with undergraduates preparing for a future in journalism.
Moderator: Bradley Weaver, Westminster College, Pennsylvania
Panelists: Michael Bruce, University of Alabama; The Reporter Report: A Semester-Long Experiment to Promote Student Engagement
Anthony Adornato, Ithaca College; Anatomy of a Newscast, making journalism students regular views of TV news
Danielle Deavours, University of Alabama; Preparing students for the industry through media literacy, one of the top skills employers look for when hiring
Amy Marcinkiewicz, Broadcast Journalist, WPXI-TV, Pittsburgh; How to become a local news junkie for beginners

[Saturday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Room C


Ethics and Norms in Sports, Documentary, and Journalism

[State of the Industry Track]
Leighton Peterson, Miami University; Ancient Aliens, Guerrilla Archaeology, and the Hijacked Genre of Documentary Film
Roxane Coche, University of Florida; Eurosport, gender and soccer in England, France, Germany and Spain: How the “European ESPN” covered soccer during the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup
Bradley Wilson, Midwestern State University; Photojournalistic Ethical Standards: Print and Video Photographers Disagree

[Saturday]
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Village View


Creative Works Competition Screening – Faculty & Student Sports
[Creative Showcase] 
Faculty Sports Competition
Steven Weiss, Colorado State University; Olivia Landis- New York Jets Reporter
Student Sports Competition (Production Category)
Kelsea Bickerstaff & Cheyenne Plummer, University of Oklahoma; Sooner Sports Pad
Shelby White, Vanessa Tapia & CAPS 13 Sports Broadcasting, Pittsburg State University; PSU vs UCO MIAA Baseball Tournament
Student Sports Competition (Story Category)

Craig Tidmore, Midwestern State University; The Walk-On: Softball
Tammy Rae Matthews & Emilie Johnson, University of Colorado Boulder; You Can Play Roller Derby
 

[Saturday]
12:00 – 1:30 pm
Dining Hall


Lunch in the Williams Village Dining Hall

[Saturday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Room B


Mini-Symposium Signature Panel: A Nation Fragmented: Television News, Public Priorities, and Democracy

[Political Communication Mini-Symposium]
Public interests have fractured over the course of the later 20th and early 21st century. Between 1975, when three major networks still dominated television and the vast majority of Americans received a daily paper, and 2014, when most Americans had a Facebook account and could receive nearly 200 cable channels, the public’s policy priorities have become less and less clear. Today, even in moments of national crisis, the public agenda lacks the focus it had in the mass media era. What role did the news media play in fragmenting the public agenda? Did the public’s shared priorities fall apart as attention to the news declined, or were they driven apart in the expanding news environment made possible by cable and the internet? Understanding how and why the public’s agenda fragmented has implications for understanding media influence, political power, and, ultimately, how contemporary democracy works.
Presenters: Jill A. Edy, University of Oklahoma
Patrick C. Meirick, University of Oklahoma

[Saturday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Breakout A


Teaching with VR-AR-360 VIDEO: The challenge of the next big thing!
[Immersive Track]
As technology improves, curriculum must change to keep up, but how do you know if these changes are the next big thing or the next big flop? Explore how programs of varying sizes deal with the challenges of keeping their programs up-to-date.  Panel participants will talk about how they are building virtual reality, augmented reality and everything in-between into their programs and why some are not yet ready to take the leap.  Panelist will discuss their experiences in selecting technology as well as working with curriculum committees to incorporate the materials into their classes. 
Panelists: Jennifer Meadows, California State University – Chico
Suzy Smith, Ball State University
Oscar Guerra, San Francisco State University
Dani Castillo, Colorado State University
Christine Taylor, Butler University
Melanie LaRosa, Pace University
Todd O’Neill, Middle Tennessee State University 

[Saturday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Breakout B


Practice-Based Research/Research-Based Practice

[Faculty Development Track]
Serena Miller, Michigan State University; Pathways to reimagining publicly engaged scholarship in the communication field: tenure and promotion guidelines and indicators for applied and artistic scholars
Janet Ruppert, University of Colorado-Boulder; A Playful Approach to A Difficult Topic: Using Board Games to Engage Families with Digital Privacy

Jason Guthrie, Samford University; “An Appearance of Reality Which Cheats the Senses”: Stereographs as Early Immersive Storytelling

[Saturday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Room A

The Teaching Panel: Innovations for the Classroom
[Pedagogy Track]
Laveda Peterlin, University of Saint Mary; Using Screen Narrative Ethnography (Sne) in Higher Education
Norman Youngblood, Auburn University, Lakshmi Tirumala, Drake University & Tom Hallaq, Kansas State University; College Television Program Adoption of Social Media Video and Captioning
Jim Sernoe & Mitzi Lewis, Midwestern State University; College Media, Social Media and Building Your Brand

[Saturday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Room C


The Complexities of Intercultural Communication

[Media Track]
Meaning is a social construction created from communication interaction. Based on this assertion, much of what individuals perceive as reality is their own social construction of their lives and the world around them. This panel features authors of individual chapters of the new book, “Narratives of Storytelling: The Complexities of Intercultural Communication,” demonstrating some of the complexities of intercultural communication covered by the book. The various chapters address communication challenges in social, traditional media and digital media environments. Topics represented by the panelists include “Examining News Narratives of the 2018 U.S. Border Policy in Spanish and English” and “Social Media Campaign to Improve Religious Tolerance in Pakistan.”
Moderator: Tony DeMars, Texas A&M University – Commerce
Panelists: Syed Ali Hussain, Arizona State University
Lowery Woodall, Millersville University
Lisa M. Paulin, North Carolina Central University
Jeffrey Wilkinson, Florida A&M University
Darrell Roe, Eastern New Mexico University
George L. Daniels, University of Alabama

[Saturday]
1:30 – 2:30 pm
Village View


Creative Works Competition Screening – Faculty & Student Video & Open
[Creative Showcase] 
Faculty Open Competition
Ringo Jones & Tom Beuerlein, Saint Louis University; Fall Apart
Faculty Video Competition (Instructional Category)
Chandra Clark, The University of Alabama; Disaster Reporting: Beauregard, AL
Mike Igoe, Roslin Smith, Dan Northrup & Kasey Kadowsk, State University of New York at Fredonia; Interviewing: Getting the Facts, the Feelings, & the Focus
Faculty Video Competition (Promo Category)   
Chandra Clark, University of Alabama & Scott Hodgson, University of Oklahoma; First Informers: Hurricanes Florence & Michael
Student Video Competition (Promotional Category)
Colby Ballard, University of Oklahoma; What is CASS?
Corporate Video class, Oklahoma City University ; What is Mass Comm at OCU?
Trae Brown, Pittsburg State University; Pride of the Plains Marching Band Recruitment Video
Danielle Deavours, University of Alabama; Go Red on the Street PSA
 

[Saturday]
3:00 – 7:00 pm
The trolley departs outside of Williams Village.  Meet in registration area.


Boulder Beer Tour

Embark on an excursion (via trolley) that takes you on a tour of some of Boulder’s finest breweries!  You must be 21 to attend (please have valid ID.)  Tickets are available for $55 – includes transportation, tastings, a private tour of one of the breweries, and treats.  Click here to register.