Day 1 – THURSDAY, October 18

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12:00 pm – 4:30 pm

 

Engaged Teaching & Learning Workshop (ticketed event)

12:00 pm — Learn at Lunch – Intro & overview

12:05 – 12:20 pm — Keynote speaker: Jon Schwartz, ACES Institute

12:30 pm – Design | Adam Kuban, Ball State University

-My model
-Activity: Use the model
-Share out

 

1:25 pm — Break

1:30 pm – Implementation | Candace Egan, Fresno State University & Anne McClellan, ACES Institute

-Running courses

-Resources: Funding ideas | Other resources | Resource list – group creation

 

2:00 pm – Evaluate | Adam Kuban, Ball State University & Craig Freeman, Oklahoma State University and BEA Journal of Media Education (JoME)

-Existing rubrics

-Scholarly and Development opportunities

2:30 – 3:15 pm — Birds of a feather discussion tables with refreshments (Table topics w/ moderators) | Candace Egan, Fresno State University

-Course design and Syllabi

-Rubrics and grading

-Managing classes

-Working with community partners

-Pedagogy to Scholarship

 

3:15 – 4:00 pm — ACES Institute Presentations

Presentation by ACES representatives:

Toya Conston; Service Learning on a Shoestring Budget

Cristian Morosan; Supervising Service Learning Activities and Projects

Jerrod Henderson; STEM Engagement through Mentoring \

 

4:00 – 4:30 pm — Discussion / Q & A

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5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

 

Opening Reception & Speaker

Day 2 – FRIDAY, October 19

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8:30 am – 9:30 am

 

Room #1

 

Three Angles on Reality TV

Three Angles on Reality TV This panel will present three angles of examination on reality TV. Our presentations will look at the format in terms of its subgenres, the content and audience expectations around it, and a critique of the nature of the “reality” in reality TV.

The first presentation will look at reality TV subgenres and the discourse of quality surrounding them. It argues that critiques of reality TV often unfairly malign it and miss the value in its storytelling. The second presentation looks at the content of professional wrestling as a subgenre. It focuses on how the longstanding genre of professional wrestling, which already had similarities to reality TV, is expanding into other media formats and programming that is closer in form to modern reality shows. The third presentation looks at how the intersection of reality TV and politics is a reality bending experience. There is already something about politics that calls on audiences to question what is true. The intersection of reality TV and campaigns amplifies that need for questioning.
Moderator: Robert Spicer, Millersville University
Panelists: James Machado, Millersville University; Reality TV is not a monolith: examining the various subgenre of unscripted television and its value to its audience
Lowery Woodall, Millersville University; Watching Reality TV From the Gorilla Position: Examining the Struggles of Pro Wrestling Reality Show Programming to Find an Audience
Robert N. Spicer, Millersville University; (un)Reality TV: A brief history of presidential politics and reality television

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8:30 am – 12:00 pm

 

Room #2

 

Ross Video Hands-on Workshop

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8:30 am – 9:30 am

 

Room #3

Media Literacy Mini-Symposium: Teaching Media Literacy

Media Literacy and Service Learning Opportunities in the Classroom; Carla LynDale Carter-Bishop, University of North Texas

Deconstructing Media Texts; Rajvee Subramanian, Western Carolina University

Using Introductory Editing Exercises to Teach Fair Use; Bradley Lambert, High Point University

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9:45 am – 10:45 am

 

Room #1

 

Boon or Bust:  How to Make Service Learning and Community Engagement Work for You

Service Learning and Community Engagement (SLCE) are increasingly recognized by campus leaders as desirable. What is service learning and how is it different from community engagement? What are their benefits?

How can you integrate SLCE into your production curriculum?  Through practical examples, panelists will demonstrate ways service learning and community engagement can work in the production classroom, discuss challenges they’ve faced, and present solutions.

Moderator: John Walsh, Western Carolina University
Panelists: Rajvee Subramanian, Western Carolina University
Melissa Jackson, University of Georgia
John Walsh, Western Carolina University

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9:45 am – 10:45 am

 

Room #4

 

Creative Works Competition Screening – Audio: Faculty and Student Award of Excellence Recipients

Creative Works Competition Screening – Audio: Faculty and Student Award of Excellence Recipients

Faculty Audio Competition
Rotations Podcast, Episode 2: Art and Medicine; Todd Fredricks, Brian Plow, Nisarg Bakshi, Kyle Snyder & Alisa Warren, Ohio University


Student Audio Competition
Annie Get Your Gun — Jack Allen; Jack Allen, Harding University

Catfishing in the Nile: Sexploitation and Online Blackmail in Egypt; Ahmed Hosam Refai, The American University in Cairo

KVHU Artist Spotlight – Muddy Waters; Brian Delp, Harding University

KVHU Artist Spotlight – Sam Phillips; Grace Nickols, Harding University

Political Satire in Egypt: Not Just a Joke; Yasmeen Nabil Mansour, The American University in Cairo

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9:45 am – 10:45 am

 

Room #3

 

Media Literacy Mini-Symposium: New Perspectives on Media Literacy

News Filters and Frames: Considering Customized News Feeds and Political Entertainment as Predictors of Health Literacy; Kim Baker, Alabama State University; Xueying Zhang, Kent State University; Sarah E. Pember, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse; Kimberly Bissell, University of Alabama

Media Literacy Across the Lifespan: Towards a Model Through Three Pedagogical Pilots; George L. Daniels, University of Alabama

Media Literacy, Information Literary, Digital Literacy, Citizen Literacy: Bridging Toward a Media Community; Ralph Beliveau, University of Oklahoma; Dan Kimbrough & Sara Holmes, University of North Texas at Dallas

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11:00 am – 12:00 pm

 

Room #1

 

Hate Watching: Feeding the Beast of Partisan Media

Pew Center data have found that Americans rely on different outlets for political news in harmony with their political bias. However, a media phenomenon known as "hate watching" has shown partisan viewers "sleeping with the enemy" by ironically monitoring news/talk media with which they deeply disagree.

Their reasons may include the desire for adversarial content to satisfy the need for antipathy, incite personal fear and distrust, or to find cognitive consonance by identifying “what one is not,” as opposed to seeking confirmation of existing ideas. There is a professional component to this phenomenon when media channels of opposing political commitment cover rival media content that might be subject to error and perhaps derision. Such ironic viewership deserves deeper analysis as the national news and talk media caters to distinctly different viewpoints. This panel will be devoted to understanding the causes and consequences of hate watching with regard to partisan political news media.
Moderator: Bill Davie, Louisiana at Lafayette
Panelists: Phil Madison, Louisiana at Lafayette
Ken Fischer, University of Oklahoma
Emily Covington, Louisiana at Lafayette

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11:00 am – 12:00 pm

 

Room #3

 

Research Presentations: College Media and Journalism Education

Twenty Years of Multi-platform Journalism Education: A Case Study; Tim Hudson, Point Park University

College TV News Websites: Accessibility and Mobile Readiness; Ed Youngblood, Auburn University; Tom Hallaq. Kansas State University; Raluca Cozma, Kansas State University & Lakshmi Tirumala, SUNY Plattsburg

The Structure of Social Sports Media: An Analysis of Instagram Posts During 2018 March Madness Tournaments; Dustin Hahn, Texas Christian University

Digital Radio and Its Implications for Minority Journalism Education; Maurice Odine, Texas Southern University & Serbino Sandifer-Walker, Texas Southern University

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12:00 pm -2:00 pm

 

Luncheon & Special Session & Presentation: First Informers: Covering Hurricane Harvey

When a major hurricane was forecast to slam into the Texas gulf coast last fall, area broadcasters understood it was their role to keep the public informed.

What they never could have predicted was 50 inches of unrelenting rain that totally inundated Houston, Beaumont and the surrounding region. Hurricane Harvey was the second costliest hurricane in U.S. History behind Hurricane Katrina.  What did it take to cover this major disaster before, during and through the recovery?

Join documentarians Scott Hodgson, Professor of Creative Media Production from the University of Oklahoma and Chandra Clark, Assistant Professor of Journalism and Creative Media at the University of Alabama who will moderate a special BEA On-Location panel with key broadcasters from the area. Professionals from both radio and TV stations will share their harrowing stories and lessons learned.  Also you will see a series of mini documentaries sponsored by the NAB and BEA titled “First Informers: Hurricane Heroes”, including two premier pieces.   These are the most recent in a series of documentaries the NAB used to help pass the 2018 Omnibus Law which included an allocation of one billion dollars for broadcasters (radio and television) for the spectrum repack and broadened the title of radio and television broadcasters.  They are now officially classified as “First Responders.”

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2:00 pm – 4:15 pm

 

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Room #1

 

Pedagogy and Production

This Spotlight panel brings together eight outstanding production teachers from District 5 to showcase innovation in the classroom. With an emphasis on lighting, editing, storytelling, sound, image, and storyboarding, this panel covers the gamut of media instruction and illustrates how these faculty bring production education to life in their classrooms.

Moderator: Glenda Balas, University of North Texas at Dallas
Panelists: Scott Hodgson, University of Oklahoma; Seeing the World through a Lens
Jason Balas, University of North Texas; A Low-Key Lighting Project
Erica Taylor, Texas Tech University; Cutting for the Story
Dustin Hahn, Texas Christian University; Storyboarding with Your Camera
Tonya McMillion, Collin College; The Story Rollercoaster
Julian Rodriguez, University of Texas-Arlington; Editing Techniques for Spanish-Language TV News Reports
Suzanne Chandler, Art Institute of Colorado; Natural Sound Recording Techniques
Richard Strong, University of North Texas at Dallas; Integrated Workflow: The Mechanics Behind Adobe Creative Suite in Audio and Video

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2:00 pm – 5:00 pm

 

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Room #2

 

Adobe Premiere and Adobe After Effects Production/Broadcast Tools

This hands-on session will focus on image management and creative looks for video and television.

Adobe Creative Cloud: Broadcast Tools

Broadcast tools have changed over the years, primarily in cost and feature, making it available to a larger set of users. Adobe broadcast tools (Premiere, After Effects) software that allows the user to further enter the world of professional color grading and advanced video production.

This class covers technical workflows in a format that is engaging and leaves you with a greater knowledge of color management for broadcast and video. Participants will learn key strategies to use software tools in the areas of video editing, motion graphics along with time saving tactics that can be applied to the various broadcast software and hardware used in professional production.

Whether a novice or intermediate user, you’ll walk away with a strong foundation and techniques that can elevate the quality of your production.

This class will cover:

  • Color Correction & Color Grading
  • HDR Workflows
  • Precision Video Editing

Presenter: Jay Dunmore, Loyola University Maryland

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2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

 

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Room #3

 

New Opportunities — Existing, Upcoming, & Hypothetical — for Creative Scholarship Within BEA

BEA recently approved the inclusion of a Case-Study Competition as part of their annual convention. The competition is meant to be an innovative parallel to the traditional scholarship that applicants submit for peer-review in the typical Research-Paper Competition.

BEA recently approved the inclusion of a Case-Study Competition as part of their annual convention.  The competition is meant to be an innovative parallel to the traditional scholarship that applicants submit for peer-review in the typical Research-Paper Competition. As part of the Service Learning & Community Engagement (SL&CE) Division, it offers a more scholarly destination for those who engage in these forms of pedagogy.  This panel will (1) outline the rubric that reviewers will use in order to assess the first wave of submissions, (2) reveal the process & the criteria used to evaluate submissions to the “Journal of Media Education” (JoME) for its annual creative-scholarship issue, and (3) discuss additional opportunities within BEA to further integrate creative, project-based scholarship.  Benefits from this panel are reciprocal: Constructive feedback from attendees will inform & improve the guidelines and rubrics used by Division and JoME leadership to assess creative-scholarship endeavors, and those same attendees, having seen the guidelines and rubrics, can anticipate a more scholarly forum for their work, strategically structuring their endeavors based on the information provided in this panel.
Moderator: Candace Egan, California State University Fresno
Panelists: Adam Kuban, Ball State University
Michael Bruce, University of Alabama & former BEA President
Craig Freeman, Oklahoma State University & Editor, Journal of Media Education
Respondent: Heather Birks, BEA Executive Director

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3:15 pm – 4:15 pm

 

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Room #3

 

Research Presentations: The Role of Multi-platform Media in Contemporary Life

The Picture in Our Head: How News Websites Depict ‘Others’ – A Four Nation Study; Dhiman Chattopadhyay, Bowling Green State University & Sriya Chattopadhyay, Bowling Green State University

Accessibility of State Occupational Health and Safety Consultation Website; Ed Youngblood, Auburn University, Richard Sesek, Auburn University & Fehmi Capanoglu, Auburn University

Because It’s on TV: A Comparative Analysis of National Security Framing and Frame-building in India and Pakistan; Awais Saleem, Lamar University

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3:15 pm – 4:15 pm

 

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Room #4

 

Creative Works Competition Screening – Faculty & Student Documentary, Student News & Student Open Competitions — Award of Excellence Recipients

Creative Works Competition Screening – Award of Excellence Recipients

Faculty Documentary Competition
Moods, Mountains and Masterpieces. A Portrait of an Artist: Marcia Merrins; Roslin Smith           SUNY Fredonia

Rubi: A DACA Dreamer in Trump’s America;  Carolyn Brown & Lazaro Lima, University of North Texas

The Don Whitehead Story; Brian Day, Tennessee State University

The Women of Titmouse Animation;  Chrissy Guest, Ithaca College

 

Student Documentary Competition
The Plaza District; Jamison Keefover, Oklahoma City University


Student News Competition
Coaches Cope with Strict NCAA Social Media Rules; Tyler Helvin, Westminster College

The Theatre Westminster Tin Man who needed a heart transplant; Ali Srour, Westminster College


Open Competition
Ithaca College 125th Community Celebration – Livestream; Melissa Dey, Justin Jacksen, Alyssa Genereux & Jennie Arruda, Ithaca College

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4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

 

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Room #1

 

Using Virtual Reality and 360 video as a Pedagogical Tool

This panel will explore issues related to teaching virtual reality and 360 degree video production. Individual presenters will address equipment issues, pre- and post-production challenges, distribution technologies, comparison of the most common tools available for virtual reality and 360 degree video, and the use of these technologies to teach a wide range of university-level classes, from nursing and chemistry to astronomy and physics.

The presentations will include demonstrations of at least three different systems.
Moderator: Augie Grant, University of South Carolina
Panelists: Janet Kolodzy, Emerson College
Jennifer Meadows, California State University, Chico
Pete Seel, Colorado State University
Augie Grant, University of South Carolina

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4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

 

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Room #3

 

Research Presentations: Political Messaging and the Trump Presidency

Respecting the Office, Rejecting the Lie: How Media Handle Trump’s Challenges to the Truth, Elizabeth Skewes, University of Colorado

Targeted by the Tweeter-in-Chief: Tracking Trump’s Twitter Insults in Year One; Darrell Roe, Eastern New Mexico University

Tone Differences in CNN and Fox News Coverage of the Trump White House, Derik Gray, Tyler Junior College

Defining Media Literacy in the Trump Era, Debbi Hatton, Sam Houston State University

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5:30 – 7:30 pm

 

Evening Awards Ceremony: Top Papers and Creative Winners

Creative Best of Show Winners

Audio Competition: Wasta in Egypt; Kim Fox & Nour Ibrahim, The American University in Cairo

Documentary Competition: Young Filmmakers of Ethiopia; Vic Costello, Elon University

Open Competition: The Negro Fort;  Brian Graves & Anthony Dixon, Florida State University

Video Competition: First Informers: Hurricane Harvey; Scott Hodgson & Chandra Clark    University of Oklahoma, University of Alabama

Student Best of Show Winners
Student Audio Competition:
KVHU Artist Spotlight – Elvis Presley; Bronson Crabtree, Harding University

Documentary Competition: Ghost Witch- Mary Black; Troy Jackson, Westminster College

News Competition: OU Nightly; Rebecca Walters, Madeline Roberts, Michael Bohling, Jesse Lofton & Devon Gadberry, University of Oklahoma

Video Competition: First Informers: The Role of Social Media; Abbigail Dedmon, Alé Fuenmayor, Reilly Freeman & Truman Reeves, University of Oklahoma

Day 3 – SATURDAY, October 20

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8:30 am - 9:30 am

 

On-Location Networking Breakfast

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Room #1

 

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9:45 am – 10:45 am

 

The Advantages and Challenges of Bilingual Journalism Programs

The ever-changing demographics of the United States, new and emerging communication technologies, and the media industry demand a shift in media education, one that is sensitive to language, geography, ethnography, and history.

Bilingual journalism programs continue to emerge at institutions of higher education, programs that are immersive in nature and respond to the socioeconomic realities of the nation.  This panel will expose you to various bilingual journalism programs spearheading their way into uncharted and impactful media education territories.
Moderator: Julian Rodriguez, University of Texas at Arlington
Panelists: Mel Strait, Sam Houston State University
Jose Luis Castillo, Investigative Senior Producer, Telemundo-Houston
Phyllis Slocum, University of North Texas
Zita Arocha, University of Texas at El Paso
Julian Rodriguez, University of Texas at Arlington
Dino Chiecchi, University of Texas at El Paso

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9:45 am – 12:00 pm

 

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Room #2

 

 

Telling Stories with Adobe Spark

Tell stories using mobile apps for web page, video creation and graphic design.

Telling Stories with Adobe Spark 

Adobe Spark is a creative tool that allows users to create stunning graphics and videos that can be incorporated into web pages. This is a great option for those new to web design or looking for a quick way to bring a story to life. This class will demonstrate the simplicity of the software, which takes away much of the guesswork in multimedia storytelling and design.

At the end of this class, participants will learn how to tell creative, compelling stories without the technical restrictions sometimes encountered in web coding.

In this class, we will cover:

  • Designing graphics for social media
  • Creating dynamic web stories and pages
  • Developing Spark content with mobile devices
  • Creative Cloud and image assets

Presenter: Jay Dunmore, Loyola University Maryland

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9:45 am – 10:45 am

 

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Room #3

Communication Technology Update 2018

The panels will present on overview of the changes in the communication technology landscape based on their contributions to the Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals (16th edition), published in June 2018.

The presenters will start with an exploration of the latest developments in electronic mass media, computers, consumer electronics, telephony, and networking. The discussion will address changes in organizational structure, economics, and regulation as well as in the hardware and software used for the technologies. The discussion will conclude by identifying the most important factors to watch over the next 12 months.

Moderator: Augie Grant, University of South Carolina
Panelists: Jeff Wilkinson, Beijing Institute of Technology, Zhuhai
Jennifer Meadows, California State University, Chico
Bill Davie, University of Louisiana, Lafayette
Tony DeMars, Texas A&M University, Commerce

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11:00 am – 12:00 pm

 

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Room #1

 

Technology Impact on Spanish Language Media

This panel discusses how new digital platforms have changed the way Hispanic content is produced and distributed, but also addresses similar important issues in today's Spanish language media.

One panelist is one of the writers of “Luis Miguel, la serie,” discussing differences represented by the show in reaching the Hispanic audience today. The panel also serves to kick off BEA Latin America, to take place October 2019 in Mérida, Yucatán, Mexico.

Moderator: Tony DeMars, Texas A&M University-Commerce
Panelists: Tony DeMars, Texas A&M University-Commerce
José Soto, DePaul University
Carolina Rivera, “Luis Miguel, la series” show writer
Phyllis Slocum, University of North Texas

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11:00 am – 12:00 pm

 

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Room #3

Innovating Oral History: Immersive Technology, Storytelling, and the Archive

This panel explores how archives, scholars, research subjects, and documentarians can collaborate to create innovative multi-platform projects.

Oral history traditionally lives in an archive for access by researchers. While interviews are recorded, most frequently using audio but increasingly using video, it is the transcript rather than the source files that are available to the general researcher. These are projects typically designed to add to the historical record with little mainstream public access built into the project. Meanwhile, documentaries often use oral history techniques, but have little planning for historical preservation.   In this project, archivists, scholars and media producers are working together with the oral history narrators to create both an archival project and an multi-platform documentary simultaneously. The project features female photographers working in the landscape genre, with work ranging from advocacy to fine art to illustration. The panel discussion will explore results from the pilot phase of the project, which features stories and images about oil and extraction, recorded in HD video. We will look at challenges from all phases of the project. What are the archival implications of recording and processing interviews in the HD video format? How do the collaborative practices of oral history collide with narrative-based documentary storytelling? What do audiences gain from these sorts of stories, and is a certain platform more helpful for the audience experience than another? The panel provides practitioners and scholars clear guidelines for how documentary projects can live in the both the archival and public spheres.

 

Moderator: Kathleen M. Ryan, University of Colorado Boulder

Panelists: Elizabeth A. Skewes, University of Colorado Boulder
Pat Clark, University of Colorado Boulder

Steven Sielaff, Baylor University
Sarah Christianson, participating photographer
Kathleen M. Ryan, University of Colorado Boulder

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1:45 pm – 2:45 pm

 

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Room #4

 

Creative Works Competition Screening – Student Video Award of Excellence Recipients

Student Video Competition -- Award of Excellence Recipients

 Active Shooter; Jenna Mazzoccoli, Miguel Rios, Daniel Paugh, Melvin Smith & Nathan Boone, Oklahoma City University

Hunted; Jonathan Hodgson & Jordi Riberaygua Magallon, University of Oklahoma

Six Months of Winter; Grace Babb & Sophia Babb, Oklahoma City University

The Hunted;    Ryan McAdams & Tayler Miller, Collin County Community College

 When Two Become One; Advanced Video Production Class, University of Oklahoma

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12:15 pm – 1:30 pm

 

LUNCH

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1:45 pm – 2:45 pm

 

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Room #1

Using Yammer as a Communication Tool at Central Michigan University: A Case Study

Over the past academic year (2017-18), the School of Broadcast and Cinematic Arts at Central Michigan University has been experimenting with the enterprise social media platform Yammer as a communication tool.

Yammer has been available as a communication and educational tool at CMU for a few years now, but within this past year our program decided to specifically use Yammer as a substitute for some face-to-face department meetings.   In August, 2017 Yammer accounts were created for all faculty and staff members, and regular use of the platform was strongly encouraged.  This panel will explore the results of this endeavor.  Strengths and weaknesses of Yammer as a communication tool will be discussed, as will faculty reactions to meeting in a virtual space rather than face to face.
Moderator: Patty Williamson, Central Michigan University
Panelists: Tiffani Waite, Central Michigan University
Chris Csont, Central Michigan University
Patty Williamson, Central Michigan University

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1:45 pm – 2:45 pm

 

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Room #3

 

Service Learning Project Showcase

"Service-learning is an approach to teaching and learning in which students use academic knowledge and skills to address genuine community needs."

The BEA service learning project panel highlights a variety of service learning projects. The intention is to give members ideas for their own service learning implementations in their classes.  This panel resembles a “Showcase” style variety of service learning project samples from active faculty participants that engage their students through community awareness, preservation, and heartfelt endeavors.
Moderator: Denise Belafonte-Young, Lynn University

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1:45 pm – 2:45 pm

 

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Room #4

 

Creative Works Competition Screening – Faculty Scriptwriting, Open & Video Competitions — Award of Excellence Recipients

Faculty Scriptwriting, Open & Video Competitions -- Award of Excellence Recipients

 

Faculty Scriptwriting Competition
Family; Tonya McMillion, Collin County Community College

 

Faculty Open Competition
The Leave Behind; Jason Balas, University of North Texas

 

Faculty Video Competition
Children’s Ministry Recruitment Video; Dustin Hahn Texas Christian University

Dana Gorzelany-Mostak: Songs in the Key of President C: Music on the Campaign Trail; Angela Criscoe   , Georgia College

Golden Age; Andrew Twibell, Brooke Fields, Madison Auten, Selah Snowden, Lauren E. Johnson, Kong Thao, Missouri State University

King of Hearts; Mark von Schlemmer, Stephen Price Jr., Shannon Johnson & Michael Graves       University of Central Missouri

The Civic Report; Nick Taylor, Ed.D Isreal Galindo, University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley

World’s Best Pan; Andy Gibson, Oklahoma City University

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5:00 pm

 

Shuttle from conference to the Museum District Dinner on your own, or explore one of the museums.

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8:00 pm

 

Screening of In Between at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston